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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 42-48

Predictors of allograft survival and patient survival in living donor renal transplant recipients


1 Department of Nephrology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
2 Department of Renal Transplant Surgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
K L Gupta
Department of Nephrology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh - 160 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijot.ijot_25_17

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Background: Living donor renal transplantation is the dominant type of renal transplantation in developing countries such as India. We looked at factors affecting allograft and patient survival in such circumstances as these could be different owing to unique socioeconomic, demographic, and patient characteristics. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data of living donor renal transplantation done at Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, over 5 years (2002–2007) to ascertain the factors that affect allograft and patient survival. The relationship of pretransplant characteristics of patient and donor, comorbid conditions, posttransplant immunosuppressive drug regimens, and infectious and noninfectious complications to allograft survival and patient survival were assessed. Results: A total of 554 living donor renal transplantation surgeries were performed during this period. Rates of death-censored renal allograft survival at 1, 3, and 5 years after transplant were 94%, 90%, and 79%, respectively. Independent predictors of death-censored graft loss were BK virus nephropathy, episodes of rejection, and use of immunosuppressive drug protocols other than triple drug regimen of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisolone. The patient survival at 1, 3, and 5 years after transplant in our study was 92%, 87%, and 83%, respectively. Presence of cytomegalovirus disease, recipient age ≥50 years, unrelated transplant (spousal donor or donor beyond first-degree relative), and presence of any opportunistic infection were found to be significant independent predictors of patient survival. Conclusions: Although retrospective, our data have shown comparable rates for allograft and patient survival for living donor renal transplantation in India.


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