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CASE REPORT
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 134-137

Brain abscess in a kidney transplant recipient due to an unusual fungal infection: A case report and review


1 Department of Nephrology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
2 Department of Neurosurgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
3 Department of Medical Microbiology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
4 Department of Renal Transplant Surgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Krishan Lal Gupta
Department of Nephrology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijot.ijot_65_18

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Invasive mycosis is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation. Fungal infections even if appropriately diagnosed and treated with current antifungal agents, have a high mortality rate. A high index of suspicion is required and an attempt should be made to confirm the microbiological diagnosis from each site involved to rule out multiple infections. We report here a 41-year-old allograft recipient, who presented with fever associated with chills and one episode of generalized tonic clonic seizure 1-year post transplantation. Neuroimaging revealed a brain abscess, stereotactic biopsy from which yielded Scedosporium apiospermum on fungal culture. Whole blood quantitative cytomegalovirus (CMV) polymerase chain reaction done was positive. He also developed pulmonary aspergillosis and secondary hemophagocytosis later in the course of his hospital stay. His tacrolimus and mycophenolate were stopped and he was managed with i.v ganciclovir, amphoterecin b, voriconazole, high dose i.v immunoglobulins and surgical draingae of abscess. With all measures, he showed improvement in his general and neurological condition and maintained good graft function. Scedosporium is a rare cause of brain abscess. CMV co-infection leads to increased chances of other opportunistic infections. Good microbiological workup from each site involved in immunosuppressed subjects is the need of the hour as early diagnosis can lead to lesser mortality and morbidity.


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